Friday, February 17, 2017

HONEYCOMB CROCHET HAT

HONEYCOMB CROCHET HAT

The honeycomb pattern looks gorgeous worked with chunky yarn, and create a warm, soft, and stretchy hat! 
Completely made with dcs, the pattern is achieved with FPdcs. 
Great appearance in any color, with- or without pompom.
Terminology: 
US - American Crochet Terms. 

PDF Pattern: 5 pages written instructions with step-by-step-pics and tutorials. Stitch diagram for the honeycomb pattern.
HONEYCOMB HAT
Great also without pompom!

HONEYCOMB HAT.
GET THE PATTERN!

FAIR ISLE CROCHET/KNIT SNOW HEART MITTENS AND FINGERLESS GLOVES

Another design special made for the Snow Heart pattern!
Earlier published patterns with the same motifs; Snow Heart Slippers, and Snow Heart Cap.

The crochet-pattern for the Snow Heart Mittens and Fingerless Gloves, gives you two possibilities; The mittens with thumbs, or simple fingerless gloves (handwarmers), a great approach to the crochet/knit method.

If you still have not tried to knit with your hook, I strongly recommend it!
The stitch has several names: Split Single Crochet (Ssc), Waistcoat Stitch, and Center Single Crochet (Csc). 

Also called Fair Isle Stitch, due to the perfect knit-look this stitch create, and the endless possibilities to work stranded, colored patterns with it. Just like in knitting!

HOW IS THIS STITCH DONE?


Insert the hook into the middle of the sc, between the two vertical "legs", tilt the hook slightly to the right, and the tip will find it's way through the st-loops.
See Annie's public video for how it's done, on the round, as well as forth and back.
Note that the most distinct knit-stitch will appear worked on the round.

The simple hand-warmers.

The mittens with thumb.

Detail of the heart-pattern.

So pretty!

Doesn't this mitten give a warm and  heartly winter-night mood!

Detail of side-ways sl st ribbing and pattern.

SNOW HEART MITTENS AND FINGERLESS GLOVES

SNOW HEART MITTENS AND FINGERLESS GLOVES

FAIR ISLE CROCHET/KNIT SNOW HEART CAP

As you can see on previous post, I published a pair of slippers with my new Snow Heart pattern

SNOW HEART SLIPPERS


Now I have designed the Snow Heart Cap with the same pattern, a more simple design, which make the approach to this super-fun technique easier available for everyone!

If you still have not tried to knit with your hook, I strongly recommend it!
The stitch has several names: Split Single Crochet (Ssc), Waistcoat Stitch, and Center Single Crochet (Csc). 

Also called Fair Isle Stitch, due to the perfect knit-look this stitch create, and the endless possibilities to work stranded, colored patterns with it. Just like in knitting!

HOW IS THIS STITCH DONE?


Insert the hook into the middle of the sc, between the two vertical "legs", tilt the hook slightly to the right, and the tip will find it's way through the st-loops.
See Annie's public video for how it's done, on the round, as well as forth and back.
Note that the most distinct knit-stitch will appear worked on the round.

SNOW HEART CAP:

I had to add the stamp "100% crochet, NOT Knit",
to avoid disappointed knitters!
Note the ribbing, worked with sideways sl sts.

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW TO MAKE THIS FAIR ISLE CROCHET/KNIT CAP;
PATTERN: Sophie and Me on Ravelry:

HERE


 This is a customers hat in darker colors.

Made by Birgit/Cadooh Crochet, who, by the way, has translated the pattern to German!








Saturday, January 7, 2017

FAIR ISLE CROCHET/KNIT "SNOW HEART SLIPPERS"

WELCOME 2017!!
I hope you all had some relaxing days in end of last year!

Here is my first crochet pattern published in the new year:


I'm so exited about these slippers, as they are the first pattern I've released with this "new" method for crocheted colored patterns.
I've experimented with this method for a long time, and, as I unfortunately often do, underestimated my customers' talent, skills and desire, to test and try new methods.
In only a few days I'm proved to be wrong!
People love these slipper, as I also do! Yeaaah!
These slippers are designed for the pure joy of being able to knit colored patterns with my hook!
Skill level: Intermediate. 
Not difficult, just different! 
Crucial skill: You need to understand colored pattern-charts, like in knitting, or cross-stitch embroidery.
The heart-pattern with the traditional “lice”-stitches, is an overcoming challenge as a first approach to this super-fun technique!
Not Tapestry, not “normal” crochet.
I’ve tried to demystify working with colors, without too much fuss! This is however a no-stress, no-hurry project! 
Slow-down, relax, enjoy every stitch!

The simple heart-pattern in two colors can be made in endless combinations.
Also the toe-cap is a possibility for a third shade.

The pattern is created with the crocheted Knit-stitch; Ssc (Split single crochet). Also called the Waistcoat Stitch. (The links will take you to some great tutorial-videos!)
The stitch is a regular Sc, with hook inserted into the middle of the stitch (split). Require a minimum of practice.
Same technique as I have used for the Crochet/Knit Clog-Slippers, and the Crochet/Knit Casual Slippers.
Three color-combinations for this pretty heart-pattern.

HOW TO CROCHET STRANDED COLORED PATTERNS
Traditionally done with the Tapestry-method, working the carried strands into the sc sts on back side of work.
With Ssc, you can knit with your hook! Any stitch diagram for knitting, can be worked with this method.

The result looks more like knitting than worked with tapestry, but denser, as the Ssc include more of the sc-stitch. 
As you can see on photo above, I have worked this toe-cap with regular scs! So great to combine crochet stitches!

Unlike the tapestry-method, the colored, carried strands are floating on BS of work, as in knitting!

I keep both strands on one finger, pick up the color you need as you work, if you find that easier. Check the crisp color-transitions!

The challenge is to carry two colored strands working the pattern, and to achieve a consistent tension for each color. 
It’s also a challenge to keep the strands untwisted! Lift work up holding one strand in each hand, leave hook in st. Let the work swirl until strands are untwisted. Repeat for every 2’nd round or so.

  

PRACTICE is the magic word, as for any skill we want to master.
In this version the toe-cap is worked 
with Sscs.
It is however crucial that you are able to follow the colored pattern-chart for your size. There is a full stitch-diagram for each size in this pattern!
If you’ve ever done cross-stitch embroidery, or knitted stranded patterns, you will easily understand the pattern chart!




Take it easy, and enjoy!

The Snow Heart Slippers!

Crochet, NOT knitted!




Sunday, December 18, 2016

CELEBRATING DECEMBER 2016 - 30 % OFF ALL MY CROCHET PATTERNS!!!

Normally a news-letter from Sophie and Me, means a new pattern published.
Not today!
My pc crashed, so today I will do something different;
I will send you a Christmas card!
With a special greeting for you! See end of letter!
Special discount in my shops to the end of the year!

 


If you are a grow-up, you will remember these cards everyone sent to everyone, every year before Christmas, with the same greetings on all the cards. With stamps on, sent by the postal system, not electronically!
Christmas-cards have their own tradition in every nation, and so we have in Norway, my mother-land.
Looking at old cards, they give the impression that Christmas is a special event for Norway only, very patriotic! And it’s always snow on the motives!
And often our traditional Nisse (Gnome) is part of the motif.
I admit, I get very nostalgic in end of December!
I will not go into the religious aspect of Christmas, which can be SO different world-wide for us all.
I will however present the Norwegian Nisse to you! A very special "man".
 

THE STORY ABOUT NISSE (THE NORWEGIAN GNOME)
 
The Barn-Gnome (Fjøs-nissen) is a creature from Norwegian
(and Scandinavian) folklore.
 
    

There were also forest-gnomes and mountain-gnomes mind you!
Small people!
 

Barn- and stable gnomes however, lived on every farm in the old days.
They seemed to like people, and especially the farm’s animals, and especially the horses!
 
 
Nisse was always in good mood, happy and satisfied, if left in peace!
He was a short man, “no taller than a horse’s head”. Sometimes even smaller!
He always wore dark knickers, knee-high socks, and shirt with a vest or a sweater, wooden clogs or leather boots, and a red knitted cap.
He had long grey or white beard, and… he had only four fingers!
Not many people know that fact!
And of course he could ski, as any good Norwegian!
 
 
He was very shy, and hardly ever seen. May be due to his red hat, which was grey on the inside, and if he wore it inside out, he turned invisible!
Nisse has supernatural powers. He is many times as strong as people, and also many times older!
Nisse take care of his household, so the farmer never run out of flour and food.
In folklore and literature, he has been described as the guardian of the farm.
He was a good little helper, as long as the farmer treated him well.
 

 
Especially at Christmas he would expect to get a large bowl of sour cream porridge with a big "eye of butter" in the middle, and home-brewed beer, in return for looking after the livestock.
 

When the people on the farm went to find the bowls the next morning, the dishes would be empty and clean.
That was proof enough that Nisse really existed!
 
 
Often the farmer would leave leftovers from Christmas dinner on the table at night, so Nisse could help himself. Of course, the next day the food was gone!
 
But if the farmer failed to keep him fed and happy, Nisse would do mischief, or even harm, to both animals and people!
He would be the one responsible when anything strange, or unexplained happened on the farm.


For example, because he enjoyed helping horses more than cows, he would steal hay from the cows to give an extra portion to a favorite horse!
One story tells that Nisse, finding that the farmer had forgotten to put butter on his porridge, got angry and killed the farm’s best milking cow!
Later he found out that the farmer had simply put the butter in the bottom of the bowl, and the porridge on top. Regretting his mischief, Nisse went and stole a milking cow from the neighbor’s farm, to replace the one he killed!
 

 
Norwegians know deep in their heart that Nisse exists! That is why they still fill wooden bowls with porridge and take them to the barn on Christmas Eve, because no one can really be sure!
 
Today, Norway also has the tradition of the Julenisse (Christmas-gnome), a result of mixed and combined traditions and cultures, inspired by the story about the holy Nicolaus (the American Santa Claus).


The Julenisse looks a lot like the regular Nisse, only taller.
He visits the household on Christmas Eve with presents and the greeting;
“Are there any good children here?”.
Often he demands the children to sing for him, before they get their presents.
Wouldn't you like to meet Nisse!?
Oh yes, he has a family too!
That's another story!
AND HERE ARE MY GREETINGS FOR YOU!
First of all;
I wish you Happy and Peaceful celebrations of these last days of 2016!

 

In clear text:
From December 17, to December 31, end of day, you can have
ALL my single-patterns (no pattern-packs or bundles)

with 
30 % discount! 

Valid every time you make a purchase within the period!

On Ravelry the discount is automatically
drawn from the total amount at check-out.

On Etsy you have to use the coupon-code:
HOLIDAYS30 
at check-out!
 
 
Thank you for following me to the end! Of the year!
Ingunn,
Sophie and Me

Sunday, November 6, 2016

CROCHET NORTH POLE SOCKS



Extremely warm socks for freeezzzing feet! 

Worked with crocheted "Garter" stitch, and "Purled" stitches on toe and top.

I'm kind of obsessed by the possibilities the humble slip stitch give!
OK, a crocheter will impatiently see it as SLOW!
Yes, speed as knitting.
But with LARGE hook, and HEAVY yarn, full speed!
And creating a beautiful surface, VERY much like knitting.
Actually, crocheted slip stitches can clone any of the basic knitted.

A couple of informative sites about slip stitch crochet:


Fresh off the hook.
I plan to join crochet-soles to the bottom, as I walk all over with
all my socks and slipper! Also into the garden!


Warmest ever! So soft and stretchy!
People will not believe that this is crochet, not knit! 
I think these socks may be too thick to wear with boots.
With bulky yarn and large hook,
you will finish these socks in short time!
Close-up of the stitches.
On top; The "purled" sts.
On leg: The "Garter" sts.
NOTE THE STAMP!
Tons of people contacted me to ask if  this is really crochet!

I made the socks in two lengths.
These are the knee-high.
I made them in bulky rowing wool.
LOVE them!
So warm and soft!

These are the short socks. Made in contrast colors to better show off
the stitches. Made with double DK yarn.

My lovely siblings!
Work them into any length you like.
One piece, toe/up.
Worked flat. and seamed under foot and back of leg as last.

I find the short socks easier to wear.
Only be course they are shorter!